Lauren. movie watcher.

Years ago I learned a very cool thing about Robin Williams, and I couldn’t watch a movie of his afterward without thinking of it. I never actually booked Robin Williams for an event, but I came close enough that his office sent over his rider. For those outside of the entertainment industry, a rider lists out an artist’s specific personal and technical needs for hosting them for an event, anything from bottled water and their green room to sound and lighting requirements. You can learn a lot about a person from their rider. This is where rocks bands list their requirement for green M&Ms (which is actually a surprisingly smart thing to do). This is also where a famous environmentalist requires a large gas-guzzling private jet to fly to the event city, but then requires an electric or hybrid car to take said environmentalist to the event venue when in view of the public.
When I got Robin Williams’ rider, I was very surprised by what I found. He actually had a requirement that for every single event or film he did, the company hiring him also had to hire a certain number of homeless people and put them to work. I never watched a Robin Williams movie the same way after that. I’m sure that on his own time and with his own money, he was working with these people in need, but he’d also decided to use his clout as an entertainer to make sure that production companies and event planners also learned the value of giving people a chance to work their way back. I wonder how many production companies continued the practice into their next non-Robin Williams project, as well as how many people got a chance at a job and the pride of earning an income, even temporarily, from his actions. He was a great multiplier of his impact. Let’s hope that impact lives on without him. Thanks, Robin Williams- not just for laughs, but also for a cool example.

— Brian Lord.org (via wonderwoundedhearers)

(Source: gypsy-hip)


joeydeangelis:

Trailer: Camp X-Ray (in theaters and VOD 10/28)
Starring Kristen Stewart and Peyman Moaadi

A female soldier (Stewart) is stationed at Guantanamo Bay in Cuba and forms a bond with one of the prisoners (Moaadi).


humansofnewyork:

“It seems that the more I tried to make my life about the pursuit of art, the more money controlled my life: collecting unemployment insurance, the humiliation of borrowing money from friends and family, tossing and turning at night while trying to figure out how to pay the rent. To survive I had to work hard jobs and afterwards I’d feel too tired and too stressed to paint. It’s very hard to create under those circumstances. Creativity is a delicate process. Often times I wonder if I should have just pursued a career for the first half of my life, obtained some degree of financial security, and then transitioned into art.” View Larger

humansofnewyork:

“It seems that the more I tried to make my life about the pursuit of art, the more money controlled my life: collecting unemployment insurance, the humiliation of borrowing money from friends and family, tossing and turning at night while trying to figure out how to pay the rent. To survive I had to work hard jobs and afterwards I’d feel too tired and too stressed to paint. It’s very hard to create under those circumstances. Creativity is a delicate process. Often times I wonder if I should have just pursued a career for the first half of my life, obtained some degree of financial security, and then transitioned into art.”


nypl:

This note was found on the back of a letter from birthday boy Herman Melville to Nathaniel Hawthorne. It reads: “If you find any sand in this letter, regard it as so many sands of my life, which run out as I was writing it.” You can see the full letter here,  complete with writing advice and other gems like “…I shall lay eyes on you one of these days however. Keep some Champagne or Gin for me.” Happy Birthday Herman Melville!

nypl:

This note was found on the back of a letter from birthday boy Herman Melville to Nathaniel Hawthorne. It reads: “If you find any sand in this letter, regard it as so many sands of my life, which run out as I was writing it.” You can see the full letter here,  complete with writing advice and other gems like “…I shall lay eyes on you one of these days however. Keep some Champagne or Gin for me.” Happy Birthday Herman Melville!


If studios succeed by making bad movies, other studios will follow suit. Social media buzz becomes more important to Hollywood every year, and it won’t take many more Sharknados before studios, filmmakers, and writers race to the bottom, creating terrible lowbrow art for the sake of irony (the one thing that we do not need more of these days).

Sharknado isn’t just stupid. It’s bad for cinema.

Will our fixation with “so-bad-it’s-good” lead to anything but more trash?

(via theweekmagazine)