Lauren. movie watcher.

bbook:

If “fashion is a language,” then its onscreen translation transcends time or place. When it comes to the sartorially-minded film characters that we love and those that linger in our mind, it’s not only the unique or striking sense of dress that tickles our fancy, but the way in which they absorb the wardrobe of the character into their personality and the essence of the role. And in looking back through cinema’s past, there are countless films whose style now serves as a beacon of fashion iconography.
However, when it comes to examining the way we dress ourselves in everyday life and that constant desire to reinvent and invigorate ourselves aesthetically, you can always look to the movies for a wealth of inspiration. So from the candy-flipped punk-y pleasures of Gregg Araki’s characters and Sofia Coppola’s dreamy pastel ennui to the elbow-patched and academic pleats of Woody Allen and the heartbreakingly haute world of Wong Kar-wai, let’s take a look back on a fantastic list of films featuring some of cinema’s most stylish characters.
CINEMA’S MOST ENVIABLE WARDROBES: PART II
bbook:

If “fashion is a language,” then its onscreen translation transcends time or place. When it comes to the sartorially-minded film characters that we love and those that linger in our mind, it’s not only the unique or striking sense of dress that tickles our fancy, but the way in which they absorb the wardrobe of the character into their personality and the essence of the role. And in looking back through cinema’s past, there are countless films whose style now serves as a beacon of fashion iconography.
However, when it comes to examining the way we dress ourselves in everyday life and that constant desire to reinvent and invigorate ourselves aesthetically, you can always look to the movies for a wealth of inspiration. So from the candy-flipped punk-y pleasures of Gregg Araki’s characters and Sofia Coppola’s dreamy pastel ennui to the elbow-patched and academic pleats of Woody Allen and the heartbreakingly haute world of Wong Kar-wai, let’s take a look back on a fantastic list of films featuring some of cinema’s most stylish characters.
CINEMA’S MOST ENVIABLE WARDROBES: PART II
bbook:

If “fashion is a language,” then its onscreen translation transcends time or place. When it comes to the sartorially-minded film characters that we love and those that linger in our mind, it’s not only the unique or striking sense of dress that tickles our fancy, but the way in which they absorb the wardrobe of the character into their personality and the essence of the role. And in looking back through cinema’s past, there are countless films whose style now serves as a beacon of fashion iconography.
However, when it comes to examining the way we dress ourselves in everyday life and that constant desire to reinvent and invigorate ourselves aesthetically, you can always look to the movies for a wealth of inspiration. So from the candy-flipped punk-y pleasures of Gregg Araki’s characters and Sofia Coppola’s dreamy pastel ennui to the elbow-patched and academic pleats of Woody Allen and the heartbreakingly haute world of Wong Kar-wai, let’s take a look back on a fantastic list of films featuring some of cinema’s most stylish characters.
CINEMA’S MOST ENVIABLE WARDROBES: PART II
bbook:

If “fashion is a language,” then its onscreen translation transcends time or place. When it comes to the sartorially-minded film characters that we love and those that linger in our mind, it’s not only the unique or striking sense of dress that tickles our fancy, but the way in which they absorb the wardrobe of the character into their personality and the essence of the role. And in looking back through cinema’s past, there are countless films whose style now serves as a beacon of fashion iconography.
However, when it comes to examining the way we dress ourselves in everyday life and that constant desire to reinvent and invigorate ourselves aesthetically, you can always look to the movies for a wealth of inspiration. So from the candy-flipped punk-y pleasures of Gregg Araki’s characters and Sofia Coppola’s dreamy pastel ennui to the elbow-patched and academic pleats of Woody Allen and the heartbreakingly haute world of Wong Kar-wai, let’s take a look back on a fantastic list of films featuring some of cinema’s most stylish characters.
CINEMA’S MOST ENVIABLE WARDROBES: PART II
bbook:

If “fashion is a language,” then its onscreen translation transcends time or place. When it comes to the sartorially-minded film characters that we love and those that linger in our mind, it’s not only the unique or striking sense of dress that tickles our fancy, but the way in which they absorb the wardrobe of the character into their personality and the essence of the role. And in looking back through cinema’s past, there are countless films whose style now serves as a beacon of fashion iconography.
However, when it comes to examining the way we dress ourselves in everyday life and that constant desire to reinvent and invigorate ourselves aesthetically, you can always look to the movies for a wealth of inspiration. So from the candy-flipped punk-y pleasures of Gregg Araki’s characters and Sofia Coppola’s dreamy pastel ennui to the elbow-patched and academic pleats of Woody Allen and the heartbreakingly haute world of Wong Kar-wai, let’s take a look back on a fantastic list of films featuring some of cinema’s most stylish characters.
CINEMA’S MOST ENVIABLE WARDROBES: PART II
bbook:

If “fashion is a language,” then its onscreen translation transcends time or place. When it comes to the sartorially-minded film characters that we love and those that linger in our mind, it’s not only the unique or striking sense of dress that tickles our fancy, but the way in which they absorb the wardrobe of the character into their personality and the essence of the role. And in looking back through cinema’s past, there are countless films whose style now serves as a beacon of fashion iconography.
However, when it comes to examining the way we dress ourselves in everyday life and that constant desire to reinvent and invigorate ourselves aesthetically, you can always look to the movies for a wealth of inspiration. So from the candy-flipped punk-y pleasures of Gregg Araki’s characters and Sofia Coppola’s dreamy pastel ennui to the elbow-patched and academic pleats of Woody Allen and the heartbreakingly haute world of Wong Kar-wai, let’s take a look back on a fantastic list of films featuring some of cinema’s most stylish characters.
CINEMA’S MOST ENVIABLE WARDROBES: PART II
bbook:

If “fashion is a language,” then its onscreen translation transcends time or place. When it comes to the sartorially-minded film characters that we love and those that linger in our mind, it’s not only the unique or striking sense of dress that tickles our fancy, but the way in which they absorb the wardrobe of the character into their personality and the essence of the role. And in looking back through cinema’s past, there are countless films whose style now serves as a beacon of fashion iconography.
However, when it comes to examining the way we dress ourselves in everyday life and that constant desire to reinvent and invigorate ourselves aesthetically, you can always look to the movies for a wealth of inspiration. So from the candy-flipped punk-y pleasures of Gregg Araki’s characters and Sofia Coppola’s dreamy pastel ennui to the elbow-patched and academic pleats of Woody Allen and the heartbreakingly haute world of Wong Kar-wai, let’s take a look back on a fantastic list of films featuring some of cinema’s most stylish characters.
CINEMA’S MOST ENVIABLE WARDROBES: PART II

bbook:

If “fashion is a language,” then its onscreen translation transcends time or place. When it comes to the sartorially-minded film characters that we love and those that linger in our mind, it’s not only the unique or striking sense of dress that tickles our fancy, but the way in which they absorb the wardrobe of the character into their personality and the essence of the role. And in looking back through cinema’s past, there are countless films whose style now serves as a beacon of fashion iconography.

However, when it comes to examining the way we dress ourselves in everyday life and that constant desire to reinvent and invigorate ourselves aesthetically, you can always look to the movies for a wealth of inspiration. So from the candy-flipped punk-y pleasures of Gregg Araki’s characters and Sofia Coppola’s dreamy pastel ennui to the elbow-patched and academic pleats of Woody Allen and the heartbreakingly haute world of Wong Kar-wai, let’s take a look back on a fantastic list of films featuring some of cinema’s most stylish characters.

CINEMA’S MOST ENVIABLE WARDROBES: PART II



 I’m not asking you to forgive me. I’ll never understand or forgive myself. And if a bullet gets me, so help me, I’ll laugh at myself for being an idiot. There’s one thing I do know… and that is that I love you, Scarlett. In spite of you and me and the whole silly world going to pieces around us, I love you. Because we’re alike. Bad lots, both of us. Selfish and shrewd. But able to look things in the eyes as we call them by their right names. 

 I’m not asking you to forgive me. I’ll never understand or forgive myself. And if a bullet gets me, so help me, I’ll laugh at myself for being an idiot. There’s one thing I do know… and that is that I love you, Scarlett. In spite of you and me and the whole silly world going to pieces around us, I love you. Because we’re alike. Bad lots, both of us. Selfish and shrewd. But able to look things in the eyes as we call them by their right names. 

 I’m not asking you to forgive me. I’ll never understand or forgive myself. And if a bullet gets me, so help me, I’ll laugh at myself for being an idiot. There’s one thing I do know… and that is that I love you, Scarlett. In spite of you and me and the whole silly world going to pieces around us, I love you. Because we’re alike. Bad lots, both of us. Selfish and shrewd. But able to look things in the eyes as we call them by their right names.

I’m not asking you to forgive me. I’ll never understand or forgive myself. And if a bullet gets me, so help me, I’ll laugh at myself for being an idiot. There’s one thing I do know… and that is that I love you, Scarlett. In spite of you and me and the whole silly world going to pieces around us, I love you. Because we’re alike. Bad lots, both of us. Selfish and shrewd. But able to look things in the eyes as we call them by their right names.

(Source: ifallelseperished)



"I feel that there is no gate that has been kept that I need to go through. I only say that because it is something that has freed me. I don’t even go to meetings. I do not go in and say, “Can you help me make this film?” I only go in if you are inviting me to tell me how you will help me make this film. It is a different posture—it is “I am making this thing. Do you want to help me make it?” If any of us try to wait for permission, it is not going to happen for us. But for better or worse, with the collapsing model of the industry, with the advent of social media and digital filmmaking, it is no longer a space where we have to sit back and wait to be heard. The compromise is recalibrating what we see as success. Is it enough to have that moment where you have reached this sister in Germany and go audience by audience and get love at the black film festivals and cultivate your audience as you go? Is it OK if you don’t win the awards or make it to a talk show or the cover of a magazine? Once we reconcile in ourselves that what we really want is to tell stories and to connect with an audience, that needs to be just as valuable to us. We need to stay focused on what matters." - Ava Duvernay
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"I feel that there is no gate that has been kept that I need to go through. I only say that because it is something that has freed me. I don’t even go to meetings. I do not go in and say, “Can you help me make this film?” I only go in if you are inviting me to tell me how you will help me make this film. It is a different posture—it is “I am making this thing. Do you want to help me make it?” If any of us try to wait for permission, it is not going to happen for us. But for better or worse, with the collapsing model of the industry, with the advent of social media and digital filmmaking, it is no longer a space where we have to sit back and wait to be heard. The compromise is recalibrating what we see as success. Is it enough to have that moment where you have reached this sister in Germany and go audience by audience and get love at the black film festivals and cultivate your audience as you go? Is it OK if you don’t win the awards or make it to a talk show or the cover of a magazine? Once we reconcile in ourselves that what we really want is to tell stories and to connect with an audience, that needs to be just as valuable to us. We need to stay focused on what matters." - Ava Duvernay